Welcome 2019

2019-01-10 03:59:18 elkecole

Welcome to 2019!

We started the year full steam with a workshop at Collective Space in Duncan. Lot’s of learning and good fun , and the meeting room was painted. We hope to keep this momentum going with more local workshops:

Journey into Natural homes , Jan 19 in at Collective Space in Duncan

Claypaint and simple natural plaster , January 26 at Collective Space

and

Design your Natural Home , March 23/24 at OUR Ecovillage

Dream your dream and make it real this year!

At the end of 2018 I sent a newsletter to my list. Here’s an excerpt:

… At this time I reflect on 2018, a year of continuing the shift I began by going abroad. A central topic to my life seems to be around the question “what is home?”.
During our travels we created ‘home’ in a few locations: a tent at Amarula campsite while building a cabin, a shared apartment in Berlin, an apartment overlooking the city of Bamenda in Cameroon and finally a shared house not far from Nairobi. We learned to have home in our luggage and with each other, with place and facilities changing. I’m guessing, those of you who travel can relate. …

Read the full newsletter

or if you just want to see this years offers as they stand today go to the workshop page.

Help wanted!

Volunteers in Duncan to help with the construction of a playground for the Cowichan Intercultural Society. The work will be taking place from March onward. Learn to build with Cob, Wood, tires and you’ll be planting. Please send an email with your phone contact and an introduction with info about you, your skills, and why you want to participate, to: elke@elkecole.com

************

Support person in social media and marketing outreach:

This is an opportunity for a trade for workshop for someone who is well versed in social media, with a feel for the culture around natural building (‘Marketing for Hippies’) . Part time , location not important. Talk to me! elke@elkecole.com

Posted in: communitydesignnatural buildingNewsUncategorizedTagged in: belongingCobcommunityplaster Read more... 0 comments

Smoke free kitchens: Africa kitchen revolution keeps going

2018-12-18 02:29:51 elkecole

improved cook stoveI am delighted today to get news of an award (Gender Just Climate Solutions Award) that was given to Sonita Mbah from Betterworld Cameroon. She actually received the award in 2017, but could not participate in the event. So today I saw the press conference recording from COP 24 which I will share below.

Sonita is championing the project we started together in 2015/16: the Africa Kitchen Revolution. We started in the local village with a group of women and taught them to build rocket cook stoves. The model for this was to teach a group by building or two example stoves in home kitchens and then ask those women to build stoves for the rest of the members of the group. In 2016 we held a training for trainers to be able to reach more women .

 

If you listen to Sonita’s statement the intention we set together has been moving forward:

Women are teaching women to build their own mud stoves.

Following this work in Cameroon I have shared the stove building process again in Kenya. And the rocket stove technology has been moving into a few other countries in Africa . Here’s an example from the Gambia by builder Alagie Manneh:

work of Alagie Manneh

To me it comes down to this:

In order to serve the needs of the women who in many cases have no access to cash income, a technology has to be culturally acceptable, attainable, locally doable and independent from industrial processes . If the women succeed to spread the skills and continue to develop the design to suit their particular cooking needs, this project is successful.

If you are interested in trainings for stoves like this please contact me. I will be in East Africa in 2019 and can be available to groups or organizations.

Here now as promised the award presentation: Sonita is speaking at 16:25

 

Posted in: Cameroonnatural buildingNewsPermacultureTagged in: BetterWorld Camerooncook stovekitchentraining of trainerswomen Read more... 0 comments

Building with Earth- an invitation to creative expression

2016-05-15 12:55:54 elkecole

I made a comment on Facebook  recently stating how much I love to work with cob more than any other earth building method.

cob and bottles

Here’s a selection of techniques and my impressions which help me decide which method to use in a specific location:

Earthbags

earthbags as foundation

We’ve built Earthbag foundations  in Canada (OUR Ecovillage ), Tanzania and Cameroon. The earthbag foundations work well and are low cost in places where stone isn’t available.

At a Natural building colloquium I filled long tubes with earth. Friends from the natural building movement have built beautiful domes and other homes with this method. I believe if there’s clay in your soil, forget the bags and build freely with that clay-soil. It’s a matter of location and what’s available.

Rammed Earth

Another amazing technique producing beautiful and stunning buildings is Rammed Earth. Layers of different colors tell the story of the earth at the location. I’m talking about rammed earth free of cement here, as its being done by several builders in Europe. This way of building requires serious formwork and planning. My personal experience is limited to observation, because in my work I’ve been in locations where that formwork is very difficult (expensive) to build. As a result rammed earth shows up on the high end of building cost and in larger scale buildings.

Mud blocks

Adobe in Africa

Many cultures have built with Mud blocks (Adobe) and still do so. Here in Cameroon  I see homes being constructed with a mud-block infill system, using concrete for structural support:  ringbeams and to bridge large openings. Local people have experience producing these blocks and will make their own when it’s time to build a home.  Making blocks doesn’t require much: water and clay-soil. Fiber isn’t so commonly used but is useful to prevent cracks and to strengthen the blocks. You need a flat area to lay out the blocks to dry in the sun- this will take about a week. Then dry storage until construction begins. Building walls with blocks requires some skill- to build a house takes some practice at masonry work. And those blocks are very heavy to lift. However, depending on seasonal patterns and workflow, this can be a great way to build an earth home.

Compressed Earth Blocks

compressed earth block press at work

Compressed earth blocks (CEB’s) can be made with or without cement for stabilization in various shapes and sizes. Simple mechanical block presses require  at least two people to work together – mixing the clay-soil (sometimes sifted) with a little water, then filling the form and compressing with the power of a long lever. Scale it up and you’ll see machines working with hydraulics taking the hard work out, but driving up the cost . The result is a firm, even block, sometimes interlocking. We’ve just finished building our dormitory walls with CEB’s – because we had the perfect soil on site, were too late in the season for sundried blocks , and had straight walls to build. We hired a local builder to lay the blocks as they came from the press. It got the job done.

Cob

cob makes sculpted walls

Parallel to this process our volunteers were building with cob. We created some hybrid walls with the blocks to add sculptural details and bottles. And we shaped benches and a lounge area. A layer of cob fills awkward spots in the block walls (filling around posts etc) . I watched inexperienced building volunteers mix great batches of cob, build the walls and trim them. Everybody took on designing with bottles- allowing one individual  to be the overall artistic eye.

And that’s where that statement came from.

Watching people, who have never built anything, confidently building something beautiful makes my heart sing.

Earth Plasters

applying natural plaster

We’ll be moving into Earth plasters next – where sculptures get refined and block-walls disappear behind a hand-applied layer of mud. Earthen plasters can be simple sand/clay mixes applied by hand or more sophisticated ones with additions of ingredients like mica or marble dust, finished with special trowels. It’s up to the availability of materials, skills and  taste, desires and budget of the owner.

Hybrid of techniques

The beauty with all of the options above is the possibility of mixing things up. We call it hybrid homes- for example walls of cob on one side and straw-bale on the other. Or adobe with inserts of cob for bottles and other sculpted elements. All tied together with beautiful natural plaster finishes.

I’m heading to Kenya this summer to create a cabin for my host Joannah in a couple of workshops. She’s already collecting beautiful things to incorporate. Dreaming her space. Clearing the site.

the site for the cob house

When participants arrive we’ll work with a selection of techniques appropriate to the location and learn about decision-making in the process. This opens up the possibility of  being creative builders in collaboration with others. We’ll be supporting the first stage of a learning center for permaculture in a protected forest.

So if you are so inclined, come to Kenya this August!  You will get your hands muddy and experience a different sort of safari!

 

 

Posted in: Camerooncobnatural buildingUncategorizedTagged in: CobEarth buildingearthbagplasterworkshop Read more... 3 comments

A gift of empowerment

2015-11-27 09:48:56 elkecole

The season of gift giving is coming around as Christmas time approaches. Who do you choose to support with your donations or efforts? Are you hosting a seasonal party that could be a fundraising event? Does the company you work for support charity?

I am once again in Cameroon, working with Better World Cameroon toward the ambitious goal to transform the rural area of Bafut into Bafut Ecovillage. I invite you to consider some of our activities when choosing who to support:

Africa Kitchen Revolution stove projectOur stove project “Africa Kitchen Revolution” will train women in villages to build rocket cook stoves. In our experience this is a process that groups can learn to supply each member with a stove in subsequent weeks. A rocket stove is an energy efficient stove that uses small amounts of firewood, cooks two or more pots at a time, and has a chimney to remove smoke from the kitchen.
What a perfect gift for a family! Or even a village. A donation of $200 will enable us to run a workshop for a group of women.

 



alignright

Our Permaculture learning center in Alegnwi will continue to be developed. This coming season we will build beautiful sleeping spaces for our visitors and volunteers. A solar system will be installed and the spring secured and constructed to deliver fresh, clean drinking water.
builders with raffia benchAs part of the center we look for kitchen equipment, and our hall and sleeping rooms will need furniture. To stay with our ecological building strategy this will be made by local craftsmen.

 

 

farmers dicuss colocaciaVillagers in more remote parts of Bafut are looking for support with farming issues and transport. Your support may help us find expertise on crop diseases to help insure food sovereignty.

Better World’s network reaches around the globe and we offer a few ways to make donations:

  • Paypal: on our website is a paypal button (top of sidebar) that takes you to the account of our Partner Ndanifor Gardens UK trust. Donations that are received this way get extra power, because funds raised by the trust are boosted by the British Government. If you live in Britain, you can also get your tax receipt from them. You can make general donations or name the project or purpose you wish to support
  • Those of you who are residents in Germany can make a bank transfer to our partner organisation SONED Berlin Friedrichshain e.V., account # DE53 4306 0967 8025 3066 01, BIC: GENO DE M1 GLS . Assign to either Better World Cameroon or Stove Project Better World Cameroon. Tax receipts are available for larger amounts upon request to info@soned.de
  • Using MoneyGram or Western Union is a fast and secure way to send your donation. You will have to name administrator Sonita Mbah or director Joshua Konkankoh for us to be able to receive the funds.

Please write to us if you have questions or concerns.

May the season’s blessings bring peace, abundance and good connections to all!

Posted in: Cameroonmy personal takeUncategorizedTagged in: BetterWorld Camerooncook stovewomenworkshop Read more... 1 comment

Celebrating Bafut culture

2014-12-24 16:17:06 elkecole

It’s holiday season and while we are not in the Northern Hemisphere to follow our family’s traditions like enjoying Glühwein at a festive Christmas market in Germany or going into the woods to find a christmas tree, we have great occasions here in Cameroon.

Fon's dance BafutThanks to Better World Cameroon we have a relationship with the Bafut Palace and received invitations to the annual Fon’s dance, including a lunch and an evening banquet. This is no small affair! The small village area around the palace is filled with folks in their colorful traditional costumes. Bars are doing record business as are the producers of traditional jewelry, and other adornments.

When the music begins and gunshots blast the excitement is palpable- people cheer and start dancing. Imagine a large square filled with a crowd in a rhythmic circular  motion .

The evening banquet was a pleasant surprise: set in a courtyard surrounded by stone walls, the atmosphere was more intimate. Live music playing ‘bottle dance’ , voices singing, people chatting, and food and drink for all.

CM did a lot of filming throughout and I have compiled a short video for your enjoyment. With this video I wish to express my gratitude to the community in Bafut and Better world Cameroon.

 

Posted in: Cameroonmy personal taketravelUncategorizedTagged in: BafutBetterWorld Camerooncommunityculturetraditiontraditional costume at Bafut Read more... 0 comments