Posts

improved cook stoveI am delighted today to get news of an award (Gender Just Climate Solutions Award) that was given to Sonita Mbah from Betterworld Cameroon. She actually received the award in 2017, but could not participate in the event. So today I saw the press conference recording from COP 24 which I will share below.

Sonita is championing the project we started together in 2015/16: the Africa Kitchen Revolution. We started in the local village with a group of women and taught them to build rocket cook stoves. The model for this was to teach a group by building or two example stoves in home kitchens and then ask those women to build stoves for the rest of the members of the group. In 2016 we held a training for trainers to be able to reach more women .

 

If you listen to Sonita’s statement the intention we set together has been moving forward:

Women are teaching women to build their own mud stoves.

Following this work in Cameroon I have shared the stove building process again in Kenya. And the rocket stove technology has been moving into a few other countries in Africa . Here’s an example from the Gambia by builder Alagie Manneh:

work of Alagie Manneh

To me it comes down to this:

In order to serve the needs of the women who in many cases have no access to cash income, a technology has to be culturally acceptable, attainable, locally doable and independent from industrial processes . If the women succeed to spread the skills and continue to develop the design to suit their particular cooking needs, this project is successful.

If you are interested in trainings for stoves like this please contact me. I will be in East Africa in 2019 and can be available to groups or organizations.

Here now as promised the award presentation: Sonita is speaking at 16:25

 

The season of gift giving is coming around as Christmas time approaches. Who do you choose to support with your donations or efforts? Are you hosting a seasonal party that could be a fundraising event? Does the company you work for support charity?

I am once again in Cameroon, working with Better World Cameroon toward the ambitious goal to transform the rural area of Bafut into Bafut Ecovillage. I invite you to consider some of our activities when choosing who to support:

Africa Kitchen Revolution stove projectOur stove project “Africa Kitchen Revolution” will train women in villages to build rocket cook stoves. In our experience this is a process that groups can learn to supply each member with a stove in subsequent weeks. A rocket stove is an energy efficient stove that uses small amounts of firewood, cooks two or more pots at a time, and has a chimney to remove smoke from the kitchen.
What a perfect gift for a family! Or even a village. A donation of $200 will enable us to run a workshop for a group of women.

 



alignright

Our Permaculture learning center in Alegnwi will continue to be developed. This coming season we will build beautiful sleeping spaces for our visitors and volunteers. A solar system will be installed and the spring secured and constructed to deliver fresh, clean drinking water.
builders with raffia benchAs part of the center we look for kitchen equipment, and our hall and sleeping rooms will need furniture. To stay with our ecological building strategy this will be made by local craftsmen.

 

 

farmers dicuss colocaciaVillagers in more remote parts of Bafut are looking for support with farming issues and transport. Your support may help us find expertise on crop diseases to help insure food sovereignty.

Better World’s network reaches around the globe and we offer a few ways to make donations:

  • Paypal: on our website is a paypal button (top of sidebar) that takes you to the account of our Partner Ndanifor Gardens UK trust. Donations that are received this way get extra power, because funds raised by the trust are boosted by the British Government. If you live in Britain, you can also get your tax receipt from them. You can make general donations or name the project or purpose you wish to support
  • Those of you who are residents in Germany can make a bank transfer to our partner organisation SONED Berlin Friedrichshain e.V., account # DE53 4306 0967 8025 3066 01, BIC: GENO DE M1 GLS . Assign to either Better World Cameroon or Stove Project Better World Cameroon. Tax receipts are available for larger amounts upon request to info@soned.de
  • Using MoneyGram or Western Union is a fast and secure way to send your donation. You will have to name administrator Sonita Mbah or director Joshua Konkankoh for us to be able to receive the funds.

Please write to us if you have questions or concerns.

May the season’s blessings bring peace, abundance and good connections to all!

traditional costume at Bafut

It’s holiday season and while we are not in the Northern Hemisphere to follow our family’s traditions like enjoying Glühwein at a festive Christmas market in Germany or going into the woods to find a christmas tree, we have great occasions here in Cameroon.

Fon's dance BafutThanks to Better World Cameroon we have a relationship with the Bafut Palace and received invitations to the annual Fon’s dance, including a lunch and an evening banquet. This is no small affair! The small village area around the palace is filled with folks in their colorful traditional costumes. Bars are doing record business as are the producers of traditional jewelry, and other adornments.

When the music begins and gunshots blast the excitement is palpable- people cheer and start dancing. Imagine a large square filled with a crowd in a rhythmic circular  motion .

The evening banquet was a pleasant surprise: set in a courtyard surrounded by stone walls, the atmosphere was more intimate. Live music playing ‘bottle dance’ , voices singing, people chatting, and food and drink for all.

CM did a lot of filming throughout and I have compiled a short video for your enjoyment. With this video I wish to express my gratitude to the community in Bafut and Better world Cameroon.

 

discussing project work with women

What does it take to get a building project off the ground in Bafut, Cameroon?

What will be our most successful ways to share knowledge and skills?

How can we work with the local community and have different interest groups meet and move together?

discussing the project with local builders

These and other questions are my focus at this time of beginning the work of building a meeting hall and small kitchen at Ndanifor Permaculture Ecovillage. The building will be the first part of a learning center where Better World Cameroon intends to teach “Permaculture African Way”. It will also demonstrate natural building and set the direction for the remaining development.

How did we get this far?

As a new volunteer last year I got engaged in the vision of a sustainable demonstration site in Bafut. This is part of a larger vision for Bafut as Ecocity for 2020. Part of this demonstration site is a farm, where people learn and practice organic growing and where Permaculture design is gradually being implemented.

A teaching site cannot fully operate without shelter for people. A design was developed for a learning center with accommodation in form of an Eco-lodge. Big plans for a small organization.

meeting hall for learning center

Ndanifor Permaculture Ecovillage is recognized by GEN (global ecovillage network) Africa as one of their African examples. This is bringing attention to us, and we expect to be hosting events at this site in the near future.

Close relations with Bafut Council and the local Palaces are also important elements for this vision.

eco-hut gets action

In early 2014 I worked with a group of local women to build the eco-hut. This was a teaching course to get a natural building to the village. Entirely self funded, this building was built largely as volunteer effort, in one or two working days per week. Suffice to say it didn’t get completed in three months. The local builders did put a roof on it and now the cabin is waiting for completion.

Fast-forward a few months to November 2014.

We are back in Bamenda after a stay in Europe. While abroad I was able to secure some funding from LUSH Charity Pot for the next structure, the meeting hall.

Coming back here, that means expectations- word gets around and as soon as funding is in the game everyone wants a piece of it. It gets political.

I am a builder in a foreign land here,

and I must observe local custom and learn about the local hierarchies at play. In the village we have a local government represented by the Quarter-head. He reports to Bawum Palace (which is different from Bafut Palace). As an organization we are also working with Bafut Council and Palace, Bafut being the larger Region that Bawum is part of. Our immediate community are the people of Alegnwi, part of Bawum.

The leader of the women’s group we worked with last year is also a representative in the village. Are you confused yet?

Villagers here have responsibilities to their community.

They are for instance expected to participate in communal work parties, some of which have been taking place at the ecovillage site.If an individual isn’t regularly turning up at such workdays, his or her reputation suffers.

 

Design is discussed with builders

So here we are looking at putting together a team of builders from locals, to exchange skill and knowledge and to build a beautiful hall. I have a rough plan, so as we discuss with the builders we refine just how exactly this will be done.

Meetings before action

At an initial meeting at the siteI explained my vision of the building to three traditional builders and the leader of the women, as well as a couple of members of our organization.

women will be building

The ball is now in the builder’s court to give us an estimate for the stone foundation and a post-and beam structure for the roof.

Before we actually make any contracts we will have to visit the Quarter-head and state our intentions and share our plan. Only with his sanction will this project be able to have the community-building effect that we intend.

Updates about the project

will be posted here occasionally and more frequently on Better World Cameroon facebook page.

women proud of their achievement

plaster practiceEvery program comes to an end and a good ending is a celebration of accomplishment and recognition of the participants.

Our Eco-building community courses had their closing celebration on April 11 at Alegnwi Community hall. It was an afternoon of memories of our time spent together working at various projects. There were images of work, some candid portraits and Better World’s short documentary movies.

she's done it

This was an opportunity for community members to see what we would be taking into the world.

Much talking and laughter rose when people recognized themselves and their friends.

People may see themselves in a different light when they understand that participating in these projects reaches far beyond the boundaries of this region.

It’s been a busy three months for them: many community work hours were spent on the water catchment project resulting in fresh water for drinking. Women and Youth came to learn natural building at Ndanifor Permaculture Ecovillage where we now have a small eco-hut almost complete.

Recently community members started working toward the High Value Agriculture Project by tilling and planting the trial plot.

Certificates acknowledge those who put extra time and energy into the regular training days.

“ We have never had a certificate for working with our hands” said Dorothy Nemuluh, the chairlady of Alegnwi and one of the ecovillage builder women.

woman with child plastering

That statement means a lot to me as instructor. If we can value the hands-on skills of people similar to academic achievement we may reach a better balance in our education.

Leaving the village and leaving Cameroon, I take away a sweet feeling of connection to all those I had the privilege to work with and I carry in my heart the songs we shared and the memory of being in the mud together.

women proud of their achievement

 

Watch us work together in the mini documentary Power of community: