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improved cook stoveI am delighted today to get news of an award (Gender Just Climate Solutions Award) that was given to Sonita Mbah from Betterworld Cameroon. She actually received the award in 2017, but could not participate in the event. So today I saw the press conference recording from COP 24 which I will share below.

Sonita is championing the project we started together in 2015/16: the Africa Kitchen Revolution. We started in the local village with a group of women and taught them to build rocket cook stoves. The model for this was to teach a group by building or two example stoves in home kitchens and then ask those women to build stoves for the rest of the members of the group. In 2016 we held a training for trainers to be able to reach more women .

 

If you listen to Sonita’s statement the intention we set together has been moving forward:

Women are teaching women to build their own mud stoves.

Following this work in Cameroon I have shared the stove building process again in Kenya. And the rocket stove technology has been moving into a few other countries in Africa . Here’s an example from the Gambia by builder Alagie Manneh:

work of Alagie Manneh

To me it comes down to this:

In order to serve the needs of the women who in many cases have no access to cash income, a technology has to be culturally acceptable, attainable, locally doable and independent from industrial processes . If the women succeed to spread the skills and continue to develop the design to suit their particular cooking needs, this project is successful.

If you are interested in trainings for stoves like this please contact me. I will be in East Africa in 2019 and can be available to groups or organizations.

Here now as promised the award presentation: Sonita is speaking at 16:25

 

The season of gift giving is coming around as Christmas time approaches. Who do you choose to support with your donations or efforts? Are you hosting a seasonal party that could be a fundraising event? Does the company you work for support charity?

I am once again in Cameroon, working with Better World Cameroon toward the ambitious goal to transform the rural area of Bafut into Bafut Ecovillage. I invite you to consider some of our activities when choosing who to support:

Africa Kitchen Revolution stove projectOur stove project “Africa Kitchen Revolution” will train women in villages to build rocket cook stoves. In our experience this is a process that groups can learn to supply each member with a stove in subsequent weeks. A rocket stove is an energy efficient stove that uses small amounts of firewood, cooks two or more pots at a time, and has a chimney to remove smoke from the kitchen.
What a perfect gift for a family! Or even a village. A donation of $200 will enable us to run a workshop for a group of women.

 



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Our Permaculture learning center in Alegnwi will continue to be developed. This coming season we will build beautiful sleeping spaces for our visitors and volunteers. A solar system will be installed and the spring secured and constructed to deliver fresh, clean drinking water.
builders with raffia benchAs part of the center we look for kitchen equipment, and our hall and sleeping rooms will need furniture. To stay with our ecological building strategy this will be made by local craftsmen.

 

 

farmers dicuss colocaciaVillagers in more remote parts of Bafut are looking for support with farming issues and transport. Your support may help us find expertise on crop diseases to help insure food sovereignty.

Better World’s network reaches around the globe and we offer a few ways to make donations:

  • Paypal: on our website is a paypal button (top of sidebar) that takes you to the account of our Partner Ndanifor Gardens UK trust. Donations that are received this way get extra power, because funds raised by the trust are boosted by the British Government. If you live in Britain, you can also get your tax receipt from them. You can make general donations or name the project or purpose you wish to support
  • Those of you who are residents in Germany can make a bank transfer to our partner organisation SONED Berlin Friedrichshain e.V., account # DE53 4306 0967 8025 3066 01, BIC: GENO DE M1 GLS . Assign to either Better World Cameroon or Stove Project Better World Cameroon. Tax receipts are available for larger amounts upon request to info@soned.de
  • Using MoneyGram or Western Union is a fast and secure way to send your donation. You will have to name administrator Sonita Mbah or director Joshua Konkankoh for us to be able to receive the funds.

Please write to us if you have questions or concerns.

May the season’s blessings bring peace, abundance and good connections to all!

preparing the improved cook stove

Did you know that countless women in Africa cook the family meals on 3-stone fires? I don’t have statistics, but I see the evidence all around us both in the city of Bamenda and when we go to the Village. I have mentioned building improved wood stoves frequently since our arrival here, and many women say “I want one”,  but it took initiative and some funding (VSO thank you) to actually start building.

learning about building

It’s a project!

Wopong Jocelyn Achu asked me to come and teach 15 women in the small community of Pinyin in Santa, to the South of Bamenda. She is working as VSO (Voluntary Service Overseas) national volunteer for HEDECS (Health Education Development Consultancy Services).

We set the goal to build one stove with the women in a workshop, perhaps start a second one and then leave supplies for them to build another five stoves by the end of the month of January. We hope that this will trigger further stoves to be done under people’s own initiative.

Some research into the topic in combination with my own experience from previous stove projects produced a handout with mostly visual instructions. I know what it feels like to learn something in a workshop and try to do it alone the next time: a guideline is helpful, and since not all women read or speak English, it had to be visual.

To make things affordable and easy to repeat I looked for simple, local solutions for elements like form work, chimney building, tools and materials.

presenting benefits of improved cook stoves

The workshop

We left Bamenda in the early morning by shared taxi to Santa, from where we carried on by motorcycle to Pinyin.  Mountainous terrain with densely farmed valleys, this is a highly productive region for vegetables that are distributed throughout Cameroon and beyond.

The women gathered in front of Lillian’s house, where we would be building the stove under a good sheltering roof next to the front door.  But not just women wanted to learn, a group of secondary school girls attended as well and many men and youth came by during the course of the day.

The list of materials :

the main material clay is in the yardMud bricks (the women had produced 230 bricks approx. 10x10x20 cm )

Claysoil ( the pit was in the yard)

Two sacks of sawdust

Small quantity of sand (most precious there because it is brought in)

 

Tools to have at hand:

Tropical hoe to dig and mix clay

Cutlass (machete)

Measuring tape (if unavailable use body measurements)

Buckets

 

Steps to designingsize the stove to the pots

  1. Take the largest pot that will be used on the stove and determine its volume
  2. The volume relates to the size of combustion chamber and heat path through the stove (all the same cm2), a simple chart is available to look this up:  download publication
  3. The width of the stove will be determined by the diameter of the pot plus insulation plus bricks
  4. The length of it is the sum of the first pot plus a second, smaller pot, plus chimney plus edges and channels.
  5. Finally the height of the stove as illustrated in the sketch

drawing of improved cook stove

 

much interest in cook stoves

Building the stove:

  1. Prepare a 1:1 (by volume) mix of clay and sawdust  (estimated 4 wheelbarrows of clay) and a clay mortar mix
  2. Layout on the ground: position pots, mark center lines  and edges on the wall
  3. Set edges with bricks and configure firewood feed and combustion chamber (considering 5cm insulation)
  4. Build up edges and combustion chamber.using banana stems as forms
  5. Insulate combustion chamber. We used banana stems as guides which I saw in my research, but decided to pull them up as we built up instead of leaving them to rot in place, as suggested)
  6. Fill voids with compacted earth or bricks
  7. At appropriate height set the first (larger) pot in place and fill around it with insulation mix.using the pot to form the stove top
  8. At the same height the channel to Pot 2 will be built with insulation mix, followed by pot 2 set into place
  9. Continue building up around the pots to desired height.

10. Make a channel to the chimney and set up a form to build the pipe (banana stem works here too)

11. Remove the pots and smooth all edges and surfaces inside, scraping down the surface around the pots to create hot air circulation. Place three clay supports to lift the pot- allowing heat to move under and around the pot.

proud owner of the improved cook stove

Tadah!

With the experience the women had – they already know how to mix mud, make bricks and lay bricks- we accomplished the first stove in about 4 1/2  hours- with much deliberation and figuring out the process.

To my great surprise everyone got up after the meal that followed, and carried bricks to the next house. And then the women went ahead and within 1 ½ hours built another stove with little input on my part!

women build the second stove Built in less than two hours

We will return to Pinyin to do some surface finishing and to see how things are. And we hope to light the fire in the first stove at that time. When all is done and our feedback is in, I will publish a full report and make it available for download.

At time of publishing this post, the women have built three more stoves and are on track for the last 2. I am now working with another group of women on constructing a cabin, an oven and a stove….stay tuned!

Pinyin workshop group

 

 

work and cultural exchange

Get your hands into some good African Earth!

Inviting Natural builders to come and help build our first buildings at Ndanifor Permaculture Ecovillage , Bafut, Cameroon.

Ndanifor Permculture Eco Village is located in the village of Bafut , not far from Bamenda

Ndanifor Permaculture Eco Village is located in the village of Bafut , not far from Bamenda

It’s time to build something this dry season: we have plenty of good building earth, raffia and access to wood.

Come and help create a small cabin as a first place to stay on the beautiful rural site. We have called out to women groups and local youth to participate in community training programs from January until March 2014.

Part of the activities will be the building of a wood-cook-stove and bread oven for the ecovillage learning center.

Work with me to support this community effort and give Better World Cameroon its first real natural building experience. Share what you know and get practice by immersing yourself in a different context. And escape the northern Winter.

You can also find the project on thePOOSH and follow updates there.

Lets’ talk logistics:

  1. You’ll need a Visa to enter Cameroon– this is usually not difficult, but it poses a time factor. So get on it quickly. We will provide a letter of accommodation or invitation as required for the Visa. Check with your closest Cameroon Embassy.
  2. You’ll fly into Yaounde or Douala- both are about 6 hours distance from Bamenda by bus. Buses leave mornings or evenings and cost about $10. It’s easier for us to arrange for someone to meet you in Yaounde- Better World has an office there.
  3. Living in Bamenda is fairly low cost- Better World will help find a suitable place to stay and negotiate a price for you.
  4. Good food is readily available at low cost. We will share some common meals and spend free time exploring the hills in the area. Our plan is to work on construction for 4 days a week starting January 13. You can join any time until March- we hope to be finished by April 1.
  5. Better World has a FAQ page that may be helpful.

Can we complete this building in 12 weeks?

If you have time and a travel budget consider our offer. Get your hands into African Earth!

Please email me to discuss details and if this is not for you, share it with someone!

Twiga store

 

Every once in a while the universe sends me a gift. I don’t always recognize it immediately and it doesn’t ever look the same:

It may be something stopping things from the way I expect them to go and giving a little space in time to slow down or take a walk.

It may be a detour in traffic that takes me along a route I haven’t traveled.

It may be a person showing up in the middle of my busy day.

A few days ago a visitor came to meet with me at the ecovillage. I had agreed to this semi-consultation with some hesitation and set a time frame of half an hour.
The conversation quickly drew me into a space of curiosity and expansion- touching into ancient teachings and philosophies and healing.

We moved from cob and its possibilities and limitations to exploring heaters and other clay work.

My guest had fascinating ideas and knowledge of ancient healing practices and subtle energies and we spoke about health challenges of our conventional housing and ways of doing things.

I learned that the energy of cooking on electric stoves is not supporting our well-being: both the person exposed to a high level of EMF’s in the vicinity of the stove and the food that’s being prepared are affected. Choosing a gas burner is a better choice and best from this point of view is cooking over a wood fire.

stew from a cob oven

Looking into this a little I found this conversation about gas/electric on the cyber macro health forum

Something to think about!

You probably gather that the conversation didn’t stop at the half hour mark- during the conversation I felt a sense of timelessness. That is the magic and I am deeply grateful for it.